Darwin Birds

Darwin birds such as Brahminy Kites, Black Kites, White Sea Eagles are often seen circling above the suburbs , beaches and creeks, even if they are difficult to photograph.


Here are a couple I've managed to catch and will add others as the opportunity arises.

brown goshawkA brown goshawk shines in the afternoon sun
A fleeting glimpse of a pheasant coucal


(right) A pheasant coucal skurries through the undergrowth, it's eye shining in the flash as I try to catch a photo.

This one was beside the bike track behind the University in an area of scrub and grass.





Brahimy KitesBrahimy Kite


Brahimy Kites seem to be frequent visitors.

It is a bird of the coast, and of the north, particularly around mangrove swamps and estuaries.



Black KitesBlack Kites

Black Kites are effective hunters which often congregate around bush fires, feeding on the grasshoppers and other insects which are driven from cover by the flames.

In the suburbs they also like barbeques, and will snatch a sausage from the hot plate without hesitation, given the chance.


Brown Goshawk.Another visitor to our budgies.




This falcon was caught in the act of investigating our budgies aviary.


My best guess is a Brown Goshawk.






Black ButcherbirdBlack Butcherbird

Another visitor - a Black Butcherbird. These birds are quite shy and easily spooked. Thanks to Claire for the ID.


They have the habbit of impaling prey on a broken branch or in a fork to make it easier to tear into smaller pieces - hence the 'butcher' in the name.

Range from Port Keats, across the Top End and tropical coastal Queensland.



Shining FlycatcherShining Flycatcher

Photographed at Manton Dam this shiny blue bird is about the size of a willie wagtail and is in fact the male Shining Flycatcher (Myiagra alecto).



Willie WagtailWillie Wagtail






A Wagtail at Rum Jungle.(right)





Red FinchesRed Finches -exact name unknown


These spectacular little birds were snapped in the grass on the Adelaide River floodplain.

Best guess is finches of some sort, but I can't find them in the bird books I have.








Return from Darwin Birds to Enjoy Darwin Home.








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